COVID-19 cancels summer school at all but 1 school in Bartow

By DONNA HARRIS
Posted 6/2/20

Cartersville High is the only school in Bartow County that will host summer school this year. CHS saw students returning to campus for classes Monday for the first time since the coronavirus …

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COVID-19 cancels summer school at all but 1 school in Bartow

Posted
Cartersville High is the only school in Bartow County that will host summer school this year. 
 
CHS saw students returning to campus for classes Monday for the first time since the coronavirus outbreak shut down all the schools in the state in mid-March.
 
“We have students who need to make up coursework through summer school, and many of these students need more direct instruction and support from a teacher,” CHS Principal Shelley Tierce said.
 
Cartersville Primary, Elementary and Middle, however, will remain shuttered this summer.
 
“Unfortunately, with all the unknowns, we are not offering summer school this year,” CMS Principal Matt Gibson said. “We had planned to have both a session for remediation and a session for acceleration, along with science and STEM camps.”
 
None of Bartow County’s 19 schools will not be offering in-person summer school or academic camps this summer due to the COVID-19 restrictions imposed by the Georgia Department of Health.
 
“The decision to not hold summer school this year was made out of an abundance of caution and amid restrictions imposed by public health officials during an ever-changing health crisis in our community,” Deputy Superintendent Dr. David Chiprany said. “The decision was made mid-May to give families ample time to make alternate summer plans.”
 
Tierece said summer classes are available to all ninth- through 12th-graders at CHS, but “we review students’ transcripts and determine which students need summer school to get back on track.”
 
“We reach out to these students individually,” she said, noting those attending generally take one course.
 
Classes officially started Monday at the high school and should wrap up by July 1 and are being offered in a morning session from 8 a.m. to noon and an afternoon session from noon to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday.
 
“Students will not attend summer school on campus all four days each week,” Tierce said. “This year, students will work at school two days per week and at home two days per week. We are implementing a blended model this summer.”
 
The school will be able to maintain the social distance necessary to keep faculty and students safe, according to Tierce.
 
“We will only have nine students and one teacher in a classroom,” she said. “We are using larger classrooms and spaces that allow us to implement social-distancing guidelines.”
 
Though it is hosting summer school, the school won’t be holding any academic camps on campus this summer, Tierce added.
 
For Bartow County schools, students have a couple of options for making up credits or receiving extra help.
 
“High school students looking to pursue credit recovery opportunities should contact their counselor for options provided through Mountain Education Charter High School,” Chiprany said. “For students and families seeking lessons or support during the summer, we encourage them to visit our webpage, www.bartow.k12.ga.us, and utilize the excellent online resources full of home learning activities.”
 
To prepare for the upcoming school year, the district’s teacher collaborative teams will use assessments targeting standards that were scheduled to be addressed during the last nine weeks of the 2019-20 school year that are “essential to subsequent subjects and utilized across the curriculum,” Chiprany said.
 
“We are well-prepared to handle any challenge that could arise as the result of the extended school closure and summer school cancellation,” he said. “Next academic year, specific, locally created assessments will be administered during the first week of school to identify any gaps in student learning. Any identified gaps in learning will be addressed in the weeks prior to Labor Day.”