Council also approves amendment allowing sports facilities in heavy-industrial districts

Cartersville council approves home alcohol deliveries, engineering change order

By JAMES SWIFT
Posted 12/31/69

The Cartersville City Council approved several agenda items at Thursday evening’s public meeting, including an ordinance amendment that would allow registered businesses to deliver alcoholic …

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Council also approves amendment allowing sports facilities in heavy-industrial districts

Cartersville council approves home alcohol deliveries, engineering change order

Posted
The Cartersville City Council approved several agenda items at Thursday evening’s public meeting, including an ordinance amendment that would allow registered businesses to deliver alcoholic beverages to residences within the City limits.

Under the revised ordinance, licensed package outlets would be allowed to deliver packaged beer, wine and distilled spirits while licensed restaurants would be allowed to deliver packaged beer and wine.

The ordinance only allows businesses licensed in Cartersville to make deliveries to homes within the jurisdiction of the City. 

As Cartersville Assistant City Attorney Keith Lovell noted at a public meeting last month, failure to comply would be very costly for businesses, with deliveries outside the City limits setting them up for a $500 fine and the possibility their alcohol license may be revoked by the State

And that’s on top of an additional $500 fine from the City. 

Furthermore, Lovell said Thursday that businesses that wish to pursue home deliveries must take classes, register with the State and keep logs and financial records that the Georgia Department of Revenue “can come in and review it anytime they want to.”

With that in mind, Councilman Cary Roth said he had concerns about “doughnut holes” throughout the community - i.e., areas where the lines between the City of Cartersville and Bartow County blur and overlap.

“There are 65,000 people in Bartow County that have a Cartersville address but 20,000-21,000 people actually live in the City limits,” he said. “I’d really hate for us to see us set some of our businesses up for failure in this area.”

Lovell said State law already gives businesses the ability to make home deliveries of alcoholic beverages. However, he said the City’s pre-existing ordinances strictly prohibited such. 

“Therefore, we fell into the category of places that had to adopt an ordinance to regulate it, and say yay or nay,” he said.

Lovell reminded the council that the State of Georgia does have plans to create a central data base for alcohol licenses — “an administrative nightmare for somebody,” he described the idea.

“Instead of coming to the City of Cartersville and making that application, you would make that application to the State of Georgia,” he said. “The State will allegedly have all of the cities’ and counties’ different forms as part of that … so the State will have like, 500 forms there, and then they will forward the applications to us after they’ve received them, and the State will take their fees first.”

The council also voted to approve a text amendment which allows indoor sports and athletics training facilities within the City’s heavy-industrial-zoned districts — albeit, only with a conditional use permit approved by council.

After that, council members voted unanimously to approve two such conditional use permits for a pair of businesses operating at 55 Zena Drive — Flicky Stick Pole Vault and DC Academy Baseball.

The Cartersville Planning Commission previously recommended that both conditional use requests be approved at a public meeting in December.

The council also voted to approve a change order related to engineering on the Douthit Ferry Road widening project at Thursday’s meeting.

The projected fees come out to an extra $64,250 — $33,750 of which would be used for engineering analysis of the Burnt Hickory Road and Mission Road intersections.

“There is a possibility, based on [Federal Highway Administration] comments, that it may not have to be done,” said City Engineer Wade Wilson. “If it’s not required, we would not proceed forward with that engineering study.”

Mayor Matt Santini concluded the meeting by touching upon the community’s COVID-19 numbers, which he described as “quite frightening, honestly.”

At one point last week, Santini said Cartersville Medical Center had “close to 80 people that were in their 119-bed facility.” 

He also said he recently participated in a statewide call with the Georgia Municipal Association on the matter.

“While a bunch of that was off the record, I’ll tell you that statewide there are a lot of places that are in the same situation as Cartersville,” he said. “I don’t think anybody wants to get to a situation where we're overtaxing our health care system or that we get into a situation where there are families and friends and loved ones who might need medical attention — via it related to COVID or anything else — and for our hospital to not have the capacity to be able to handle that.”

Other items approved by council at Thursday evening’s meeting include:

— A request to award Trees Unlimited a contract in an amount not to exceed $100,000 for tree trimming services.

— A request to renew the City’s lease agreement for the Montessori school facility at 324 West Cherokee Ave. “This allows them to continue on at $750 a month,” said Cartersville City Manager Dan Porta.

— A request to award Municode a contract for $29,300 for City website services.

— A request to renew the City’s Chubb cancer insurance policy for $13,320.

— A request to purchase two vehicles from low bidder Prater Ford for $48,823.60. “These are two vehicles for the administration department,” Porta said. “Once the assistant city manager position is filled, that will be a new vehicle and then I’m looking for a second vehicle four our new public relations/communications manager.”