Contract bids for runway paving project set to open in May

Airport authority approves stormwater pollution prevention plan

By JAMES SWIFT
Posted 12/31/69

The Cartersville-Bartow County Airport Authority approved the implementation of a new stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) at Monday morning’s public meeting at Cartersville City …

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Contract bids for runway paving project set to open in May

Airport authority approves stormwater pollution prevention plan

Posted
The Cartersville-Bartow County Airport Authority approved the implementation of a new stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) at Monday morning’s public meeting at Cartersville City Hall.

“We’ve obviously contracted with Southland Engineering last year to do this plan,” said Cartersville Assistant City Manager Dan Porta. “From the plan’s perspective, there’s a couple of things we need to be doing … there now has to be visual inspection of the outlets, periodically, to be in compliance with this and once a year we have to test the water off the discard sites.”

Authority Chairman Hans Lutjens told the board a notice of intent is required to be filed with the State to place the local airport under the program. 

“There’s monitoring, there’s training for spill hazards and other things like that,” he said. “There are ponds on the property — some are in the City, some are in the County — and both the City and the County require a maintenance agreement to be signed, and that needs to be done as part of this document.”

Simply put, Porta said the board should be more aware of what tenants are actually doing at the airport. 

“We’ve got to really be more on top of what’s going on with the tenants out there, because the board is ultimately liable for that," he said. “Unfortunately, the burden’s going to be back on us if something happened out there."

Lutjens said tenants at the airport would have to undergo SWPPP training. The facility, he said, would also have to install new water separators and comply with new regulations pertaining to fuel truck storage.

“I think if we don’t implement the plan, we’re in for the possibility of losing funding,” he said. “If we implement the plan, step two is then we would need somebody to identify where we’re noncompliant, in which case this could be extra money that we’re going to have to spend.”

Lutjens said he did not know when the board should have implemented the plan, “but I would probably think that we’re already late.”

Cartersville Assistant City Attorney Keith Lovell recommended the board adopt the SWPPP, then come back with a proposal on monitoring and identifying possible noncompliance issues.

Southland Engineering representative Karl Lutjens also gave the board on update on plans for the Southwest Airport Authority Hangar.

The first phase of the project, he said, would take about three months to plan and permit and about nine months to actually construct.

“What we’re proposing for Phase I is to build 12,000 square feet for the first hangar, in addition to adding some parking area and ramp area,” he said. 

He did not have a cost estimate for the board, but estimated that concrete expenses for Phase I alone could eclipse $500,000. 

“One of the biggest challenges that we have is there’s an existing retention pond down on that area,” he said. “The first 12,000-square-foot building won’t affect that pond … what we thought about for stormwater purposes is continue digging the pond out to provide any additional space that we need going south.”

Construction of the hangar, he said, may require a new stormwater pond.

“We’ve briefly talked with Phoenix about trying to locate that pond across from the west side of 61, at the back end of their field,” he said. 

Phase II expansion, he said, would make the hangar top out at about 24,000 square feet.

“The one thing we do need to look at is that when you get above a 20,000-square-foot hangar, you’re supposed to go to a foam sprinkler system,” he said. “But that is only if you have fueled aircraft within that hangar.”

Such a sprinkler system, he said, would easily cost around $100,000.

Rebecca Collins of Croy Engineering also gave the board an update on plans for the airport’s runway paving project schedule.

She said contract bids for the project are expected to open the first week of May. Actual construction on the project, she said, is targeted for July or August. 

“The best thing is working night and day for about a two-week closure,” she said. “That gets us through all of the ground disturbance effort, all of the milling and paving work so that we’ve got a smooth surface on the runway. At that point, we’re going to close it down and make it two more weekends after that, just to finalize, like, the runway pavement grooving … and getting all of your lighting, signage and permit markings down.”