Region training finds fit at CPD
by Jessica Loeding
Apr 05, 2014 | 990 views | 0 0 comments | 33 33 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Cartersville Patrol Officer Cpl. Jason Combs was among law enforcement officers participating in the North Central Georgia Law Enforcement Academy at the Cartersville Police Department headquarters. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Cartersville Patrol Officer Cpl. Jason Combs was among law enforcement officers participating in the North Central Georgia Law Enforcement Academy at the Cartersville Police Department headquarters. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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The topic of conversation Wednesday sounds like a livestock lesson — sheep, wolves, sheepdogs and how the three coexist. But, for 25 or so law enforcement officers, the sheep-wolf-dog dynamic takes on a different meaning.

“The Sheepdog Mentality,” taught by Cartersville Police Department Capt. Mark Camp, was just one of the classes offered during the weeklong field training officer course through the North Central Georgia Law Enforcement Academy, held at CPD headquarters on Cassville Road.

Based in Austell, NCGLEA partners with agencies within the region to offer sessions for law enforcement officers at outlying locations, including CPD.

“CPD officers who are instructors have been teaching at the North Central Georgia Law Enforcement Academy for many years. Over the years we have gained a good reputation with the academy staff,” Camp said. “We felt that by hosting some of their classes in our facility, we could not only help the academy but also have the opportunity for our own officers to attend training without having to go far from the department. With our new facilities, it turned out to be a good fit.”

Began in 1978, the academy offers varying levels of training, according to the website, www.ncglea.org. The organization moved to its current location in November 2001.

With classes closer to home, the department and officers benefit.

“Surrounding agencies in north Georgia now have the opportunity for their officers to receive academy training without having to go down to Austell. Our agency is known by other departments to have quality instructors and can feel confident that if they send someone to our training they will receive top-notch information,” Camp said. “An added benefit to the city is that it cuts down on travel costs for our officers.”

Hosting sessions also allows the city to showcase the new Public Safety Headquarters.

“At our training facility at the range we could have 20 to 30 officers per class. In our new facility we can have up to 90 officers attend,” Camp said. “Typically though the class sizes range from eight to 40 officers.”

“... It also looks well for the city knowing that our instructors are qualified to teach officers from other jurisdictions,” he added. “The public expects their own officers to be well-trained and the fact that we train other agency’s officers speaks well for the quality of people in our own agency.”

Officers who attend training receive Peace Officer Standard and Training credit for the hours. Officers must receive 20 hours of training per year under Georgia mandate.

“Last year we hosted five courses and this year we will probably do six,” Camp said. “The next set of classes we are hosting begins in two weeks and is a three-week supervision class. The class is broken up so that officers attend one week, go back to their agencies then come back in later months for weeks two and three.”

For more information on NCGLEA training opportunities, visit www.ncglea.org.