Clear Creek celebrates Pi Day
by Mark Andrews
Mar 14, 2014 | 1603 views | 0 0 comments | 42 42 recommendations | email to a friend | print
James Elrod and Hayven Baxter experiment with a microscope during Pi Day at Clear Creek Elementary School. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
James Elrod and Hayven Baxter experiment with a microscope during Pi Day at Clear Creek Elementary School. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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Students Taylor Bailey, left, Taylor Dothard and Hagann Hannah demonstrate standard units of measurement during Pi Day at Clear Creek Elementary School. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Students Taylor Bailey, left, Taylor Dothard and Hagann Hannah demonstrate standard units of measurement during Pi Day at Clear Creek Elementary School. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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In honor of today’s date, Clear Creek Elementary School on Thursday celebrated their annual Pi Day a little early, during which students from all grade levels made a visit to the school gym to engage in Science Technology Engineering and Math activities that incorporate some fun along with real-world scenarios.

“Pi Day is of course 3.14, and we’re celebrating it a day early and it’s a day to celebrate math. I’ve often found kids and parents have a fear of math and science and technology and things as well, and I wanted something to promote that math and science can be fun, can be productive, can be relevant in the real world and tie everything in with businesses in the community,” event organizer and math instructor Robin Morrow said. “What we try to incorporate with all the activities is something with real world or business activities, so [we] have done Steak and Shake to incorporate how math is used in the community with [restaurant] menus. ... For technology we’ve got students taking apart computers and finding out what’s inside the computers; we’ve got microscopes to look at fibers and textures to see the breakdown of the objects. ... We’re building a hang glider [and more].”

Fifth-grader Chloe Souders was helping operate a station, which incorporated the use of the school’s iPads.

“I’m using color app. It’s where you draw a certain picture and color it and put it under an iPad, it will come alive and do stuff,” Souders said. “... It’s fun while learning.”

While the color app station dealt more with technology, Souders said she enjoyed math, especially multiplication.

Fellow fifth-grader Allie Berry assisted with the color app station as well as the “How Many Licks” station.

“[At the ‘How Many Licks’ station] you have to use math and round to see how many licks you take to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop,” Berry said, adding she is a big fan of math. “I love figuring things out, and when [Pi Day offers] multiplication or division or fractions and stuff like that, I do those kinds of activities.”

She said the most difficult area she has encountered in math has been division. However, she said “Karate Man,” a previous Pi Day activity, helped make division fun and more approachable. This year’s Pi Day stations included, for example, Pattern Garden, Martin’s Bumper Cars, Robots, Devil Rays Balancing Act and Ice Cream Shop.

At lunch, all students were served a slice of pie.

Principal Kelly Wade said the event is part of CCES’ mission to further engage students, but the result goes beyond simply helping students have fun while learning.

“I’ve been going in and out through the grade levels to view the activities to promote Science Technology Engineering and Math, and every kid that goes in, they get hooked on something. They love it,” Wade said. “We’ve had a number of visitors from parents to [Bartow County Board of Education] members, to central office come through and they’ll walk around and the next thing you know, they’re hooked into it too and they’re sitting there doing the activity, so it’s awesome for the kids to look at us getting involved.”

He continued, “We always talk about being models for the kids, but they’re being models for us with this because this is their world and they’re teaching us and it’s really a good thing.”