BCSO works on active shooter training
by Jessica Loeding
Jul 03, 2012 | 1774 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Bartow County Sgt. Richey Harrell, from left, Capt. Mike Shinall, Deputy Cody Satterfield and Investigator Billy Henson work through active shooter training Thursday at the firing range. Staff from the BCSO and the courthouse attended training during four sessions held in June.
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Bartow County Sgt. Richey Harrell, from left, Capt. Mike Shinall, Deputy Cody Satterfield and Investigator Billy Henson work through active shooter training Thursday at the firing range. Staff from the BCSO and the courthouse attended training during four sessions held in June. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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Bartow County Sheriff’s Deputy Marty Teems works through room-entry and room-clearing techniques.
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Bartow County Sheriff’s Deputy Marty Teems works through room-entry and room-clearing techniques. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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* Editor's note: This is the first in an ongoing series focusing on training and education for local law enforcement officers.

"Engage!"

A cacophony of gunshots ring out, sending a cloud of red dust billowing into the air.

"Don't stop. Keep moving!" Bartow County Sheriff's Office Capt. Mike Shinall shouts.

The group of four officers moves slowly forward, firing round after round from .223 caliber rifles before transitioning to handguns as they close in on the target.

Bartow County Sheriff's Office employees in June underwent active shooter training, along with a refresher on making entry and clearing a room.

Thursday's session at the firing range off U.S. Highway 41 offered officers ideas on approaching an active shooter where the suspect would be firing at police.

Using a high-crawl technique, which is faster and less physically demanding, groups of four moved toward the intended target, taking cover behind vehicles, trash cans and simulated walls.

"They need to know this because of situations we may face later on down the road," Shinall said of the instruction.

The room-clearing scenario running alongside the active-shooter is an active part of a situation where a suspect may be firing on authorities, he said. The teams of two worked to sweep into a room, locate the target and fire.

Shinall said working in groups of four provided officers a better idea of what an actual scenario would feel like with officers firing rapidly and close to each other.

Local law enforcement leaders have stressed how important training is in keeping up with a growing population and an increasing crime rate.

BCSO Sgt. Richey Harrell, who works as a firearms instructor, said training better prepares deputies for evolving methods utilized by criminals.

"If you can put yourself in the bad guy role, you can see the mistakes you make," Harrell said.

The BCSO will continue training through the end of the year on a variety of topics. See future editions of The Daily Tribune News for more.