Bartow County Sheriff’s Office to host firearms safety course
by Staff Report
Jan 03, 2013 | 2438 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Bartow County Sheriff’s Office is answering requests from the public to learn firearms safety. Beginning in February, the department will host free firearms safety courses.

Scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 9, the two four-hour sessions will be held at 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. at the Bartow County Sheriff’s Office firing range, 480 Joe Frank Harris Parkway, Cartersville.

“The sheriff has been contacted by several individuals in the community requesting this class be offered to the general public in response to the incident in Connecticut,” said BCSO Training Capt. Mike Shinall.

The course, taught by BCSO instructors, will teach the public firearms carry laws, personal and handgun safety, and marksmanship.

Shinall said those skills are vital to anyone carrying a weapon.

“[This training is] very important as the students will learn when and where they can carry their handgun, whether in their vehicle, on their person or in another state,” Shinall said. “They will learn the proper way to carry the weapon and safely store the weapon along with the seven fundamentals of marksmanship. The ladies will learn how to carry the weapon in their purse and actually shoot through their purse.”

Each class is limited to 24 participants. Shinall said there has been a high demand already for the class.

Students are asked to bring their own handgun and at least 50 rounds for the weapon. No long guns are allowed on the course.

Anyone interested in signing up for the BCSO firearms safety course should contact Shinall at 770-382-5050, extension 6069, or email mikeshinall@bartow.org. Shinall said if demand dictated, more courses may be added in the future.

Impaired truck driver claims to hear voices, believes he is in danger

A tractor-trailer driver traveling north on Interstate 75 Tuesday night claimed he was being followed and in danger of being assaulted.

The driver, later identified as Patrick Warren Campbell, called Bartow County 911 and said he had been held captive for the past three days and was being followed by several red cars whose passengers were brandishing weapons, according to the Bartow County Sheriff’s Office incident report.

Campbell also said his truck was wired and he was hearing voices and music inside the cab.

Bartow 911 asked Campbell to take exit 296 at Cass-White Road and deputies would assist him.

A deputy waiting at the exit followed the tractor-trailer as it exited the interstate and pulled onto Kent Drive. Campbell stepped out of the truck and the deputy cleared it of any other passengers.

During questioning, Campbell said he was from Florida and that he was hearing voices in the cab of the truck and they had held him captive for three days. Campbell also said he had not slept in four days, according to the report.

Campbell said he had no medical issues and the only medication he took was for his blood pressure. However, he said he had not taken it for several days.

The deputy asked Campbell to take a series of standard field sobriety tests. Campbell did not test positive for alcohol, according to the report, but he did exhibit multiple signs of impairment.

Campbell was arrested for driving under the influence and placed in the deputy’s patrol vehicle. He did agree to blood and urine tests.

Another deputy contacted the truck owner, who said the vehicle had been sending a refrigerator malfunction code, but they were unable to get Campbell to stop. When the deputy returned to the truck he heard a computerized voice notifying the driver to stop and inspect the refrigeration system.

The owner asked Martins Towing to hold the vehicle until another driver could pick up the load and finish the delivery.

Campbell was taken to Cartersville Medical Center for testing. The samples were sent to the Georgia crime lab for analysis. Campbell was transported to the Bartow County Jail without incident.

According to the incident report, he spoke about being held captive in his truck for days and hearing voices during medical testing and the booking procedure.