Public services continue toward weekend
by Mark Andrews
Jan 31, 2014 | 1450 views | 0 0 comments | 49 49 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Mikel Martin, with City of Cartersville Public Works, plows in one of the city's residential areas Thursday after a couple of days of taking care of the main roadways. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Mikel Martin, with City of Cartersville Public Works, plows in one of the city's residential areas Thursday after a couple of days of taking care of the main roadways. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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As the snow melts away, public service entities continue to clear roads and reopen essential services. Cartersville Director of Public Works Tommy Sanders said on Thursday the city began running limited waste management services, with commercial trash pickup and backdoor routes, but no residential or recycle routes.

“[Today] we’re going to try and catch up. ... We’re going to have everybody we have from other parts of our department are going to be assisting our solid waste guys and we’re going to try and get Wednesday, Thursday and Friday’s routes all picked up ...,” Sanders said.

For the county, landfill services will be back on schedule today as well.

“The landfill opened at 8 o’clock [Thursday] morning, the four main collection centers that are normally scheduled to open Thursdays [opened Thursday afternoon] and all the collection centers will be open [today], Saturday and the one scheduled to be open on Sunday will be open Sunday as well,” Bartow County Director of Solid Waste Rip Conner said.

The road departments on Thursday also began clearing the roads on subdivisions.

“Basically, we’ve been working around the clock since the event started Tuesday. We’ve been running 12-hour shifts, running 7 to 7 every day and we’ve got three spreaders, two plows and a motor grader,” Sanders said.

He said the temperature was too low on Thursday morning to begin plowing any covered areas, but they did lay aggregate salt. As the sun came out later in the day, the plows hit the road.

“What [we were] hoping for is a big enough melt [Thursday] so there won’t be anything to freeze back [for today],” Sanders said.

He added, “The steep hills and shady areas are where we see the biggest problems.”

Sanders said, for example, Gilmer Street, Porter Street, Carter Grove Boulevard and Postelle Street at U.S. Highway 41 were deemed hazardous areas during the week. However, areas that received greater amounts of direct sunlight or were on flat ground saw less attention.

“We have received a lot of calls from the public and they’ll say ‘Hey, the spreader truck just came by, but he wasn’t putting out any material,’” Sanders said. “Most of the time in those cases, it’s either because [the driver] is in a flat area in the sun and so he has intentionally turned off the spreader to save on material, or those trucks only hold a couple of tons of material so they do have to come back to [headquarters] and refill constantly.

“Even though you see a spreader truck out on the road, if they’re not putting out material, it’s usually intentional.”

Bartow County Road Department Assistant Director Joe Sutton said the department still has work to do on some roads throughout the county, but mostly has cleared the main roadways.

“We’re still working on a lot of areas and [in] the shaded areas there’s still plenty of ice, but most of the main roads are in good shape,” Sutton said.

Bartow County Sheriff’s Office Public Information Officer Sgt. Jonathan Rogers said the department is continuing to work through the remaining weather issues.

“We’re still business as usual. We have some four-wheel drive vehicles still out in case there is some kind of blockage ... so if we need to get to an emergency we can,” Rogers said.

While abandoned cars remain on some roadways, Rogers said the department has not begun towing cars that are not impeding traffic.

“We haven’t really addressed cars on the side of the road yet. The ones that have been towed are blocking the pathway and the movement of traffic,” Rogers said. “Once roads are completely clear, they will start giving them a normal tag ... and after a certain time, we’ll remove the vehicle.”