Bartow County Farmers Market vendors set up shop
by Marie Nesmith
Jul 08, 2012 | 2861 views | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Linda Hicks shops on a Wednesday morning at the Bartow County Farmers Market. 
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Linda Hicks shops on a Wednesday morning at the Bartow County Farmers Market. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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The market opens Wednesdays and Saturdays at sunup and closes about 11 a.m. or when the farmers sell all of their produce.
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
The market opens Wednesdays and Saturdays at sunup and closes about 11 a.m. or when the farmers sell all of their produce. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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William Scott, left, talks with Michael Miller Jr. who grows organic vegetables in his backyard and sells them at the Bartow County Farmers Market. 
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
William Scott, left, talks with Michael Miller Jr. who grows organic vegetables in his backyard and sells them at the Bartow County Farmers Market. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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Colin Mulkey lines up his tomatoes on a Saturday morning at the downtown Cartersville Bartow County Farmers Market.
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Colin Mulkey lines up his tomatoes on a Saturday morning at the downtown Cartersville Bartow County Farmers Market. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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Teresa Gentry listens to farmers Charles Avery, left, and C.J. Cole talk about how to get the best tasting corn using a microwave oven.
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Teresa Gentry listens to farmers Charles Avery, left, and C.J. Cole talk about how to get the best tasting corn using a microwave oven. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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A good example of that would be corn. They are predicting that corn yields may fall if we continue in this dry pattern here and the heat too that we've had [over the past month]. What that does is it will affect ear formation in corn, and basically, if we get drought stress on corn two weeks prior to pollination, you'll get less kernels per row on your ear of corn and we may see as much as 5 to 10 percent yield reduction on corn. You'll still get corn. It'll just be smaller ears basically and [with] a lot of crops, you can see those type of effects -- reduced yields or basically smaller produce in general.