Victims' families donate funds to shelter
by Mark Andrews
Nov 24, 2012 | 2643 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The families of Patricia Ann Woody and Robert Montgomery Woody recently made a donation to Flowering Branch. Front row, from left, Jordan Parker, Vickie Harrison, Wanda Silvers, Wanda Fisher, Sandra Hite and Patty Eagar. Back row, from left, Joe Harrison, Terry Hite, Karen White and Angela James. SPECIAL
The families of Patricia Ann Woody and Robert Montgomery Woody recently made a donation to Flowering Branch. Front row, from left, Jordan Parker, Vickie Harrison, Wanda Silvers, Wanda Fisher, Sandra Hite and Patty Eagar. Back row, from left, Joe Harrison, Terry Hite, Karen White and Angela James. SPECIAL
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While the 22-year-old double homicide case in Bartow County remains open, the families of Patricia Ann Woody and Robert Montgomery Woody recently donated nearly $11,000 of reward money raised for information to the Flowering Branch Children’s Shelter.

“The gift was a tremendous surprise to us and a wonderful blessing,” Development Director Karen White said. “It was a terrible tragedy that the family experienced, but we feel very grateful to be benefiting from such a difficult situation that they had to endure.”

When family members came to the shelter to deliver the check, they also brought gifts like toys for the children, White said.

“We were very touched by the outpouring of love [the family] had for us and I think we’ll continue to stay in touch and have good friendships with them,” she said.

Patricia Ann Woody’s cousin Vicki Harrison said Woody’s mother, Jean Jefferson, originally planned to donate the funds to a children’s shelter after a period of time, but maintained hope that someone would come forward with information. Jefferson passed away June 24 of this year and her husband passed away in 2008.

“[Jefferson] said in the event she passed away, let’s go ahead and find a children’s shelter and donate to them,” Harrison said.

She said about a year ago her sister Wanda Fisher had a conversation with a young boy while waiting at a local doctor’s office who explained he was a resident at Flowering Branch.

“He made such an impact on my sister when it came time to donate these funds, my sister said, ‘I have the perfect place,’” Harrison said.

She said while the money will help with essentials at the shelter, which currently houses about a dozen youth ages 11 to 18 and provides services to more than 2,500 youth a year, the residents family members met with all had a Christmas wish list.

“All of them had [listed] the basic needs of clothing and shoes, but every one of them wanted an iPod Touch and what I did was I got on Facebook ... and I’m trying my best to raise enough iPod Touch [devices],” Harrison said.

For donation information, email Harrison at jujubee75us@yahoo.com.

According to a Daily Tribune News article dated April 25, 2011, Bartow County Sheriff’s Office Investigator Marc Barrere had worked the case for nearly 11 years.

The article states, “Barrere said there are more than a thousand pages of documents concerning the Woody murders, not including transcribed interviews. Inside those documents are details of the murder.

“According to Barrere, a co-worker of Monty Woody came to the couple’s Rudy York Road residence [on April 25, 1990] because Woody did not show up for work. He knocked on the door and got no answer; he was then able to peep into a window and saw what looked like a body under a sheet. The man entered the home and discovered Ann Woody’s body under the sheet.

“He immediately left the residence and called 911. Deputies arrived on the scene at 1:52 p.m., and upon checking the residence, Monty Woody’s body was discovered in the master bedroom.

“Although Barrere couldn’t release specific details about the case, he did say Monty Woody’s cause of death was stabbing while Ann Woody died from strangulation.”

Lt. Robert Moultrie now is on the case and will meet with the family in upcoming weeks. He could not be reached for comment at press time.

“We haven’t given up hope, we just felt it was time to donate that money,” Harrison said. “... We always said if something happened to [Jefferson], the three of us cousins would get together and make sure justice is done.”

She added, “They’re a ways on the case — they’ve got new leads and we’re hoping that something will be discovered before long and it will be solved. It’s a solvable case but they have to get all their facts together.”

Public Information Officer Sgt. Jonathan Rogers explained the circumstances surrounding the case are what justify keeping it open.

“Typically a case is open as long as there is any available information to follow up on or any evidence that can be processed to identify the perpetrator or offenders and in a case such as this, it’s pretty much never closed ... I know there is a lot of evidence in this case,” Rogers said.

— Former DTN reporter Shaka Lias Cobb contributed to this article.